How to Get Headers In Spring Boot?

12 minutes read

In Spring Boot, you can easily get headers from incoming HTTP requests using the HttpServletRequest object. Here is how you can do it:

  1. Inject the HttpServletRequest object into your controller or service class:
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@Autowired
private HttpServletRequest request;


  1. Use the HttpServletRequest object to access the headers:
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String headerName = request.getHeader("header_name");


Replace "header_name" with the actual name of the header you want to retrieve.

  1. You can also get all headers in a map using the following code:
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Enumeration<String> headerNames = request.getHeaderNames();
Map<String, String> headers = new HashMap<>();
while (headerNames.hasMoreElements()) {
    String headerName = headerNames.nextElement();
    String headerValue = request.getHeader(headerName);
    headers.put(headerName, headerValue);
}


Now you can use the header values as per your application requirements. Remember to handle null values or provide default values, depending on your use case.

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How to handle X-Frame-Options header in Spring Boot?

To handle the X-Frame-Options header in Spring Boot, you can follow these steps:

  1. Add the dependency for Spring Security to your project's pom.xml (if it's not already added):
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<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-security</artifactId>
</dependency>


  1. Create a configuration class (e.g., SecurityConfig) that extends the WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter class:
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@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
    
    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http
            .headers()
                .frameOptions()
                    .sameOrigin();
    }
}


  1. The .frameOptions().sameOrigin() method call sets the X-Frame-Options header to "SAMEORIGIN", which allows the frame to be displayed if it is from the same origin. You can also set it to "DENY" to deny any framing of the page.
  2. If your Spring Boot application is using a different Spring Security configuration, you can add the http.headers().frameOptions().sameOrigin(); code within the existing configure() method instead.


With these steps, your Spring Boot application will handle the X-Frame-Options header and set it to either "SAMEORIGIN" or "DENY" based on your configuration.


Can I set a custom Retry-After header in Spring Boot?

Yes, you can set a custom Retry-After header in Spring Boot by using the ResponseEntity class and adding the header manually. Here's an example:

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import org.springframework.http.HttpHeaders;
import org.springframework.http.HttpStatus;
import org.springframework.http.ResponseEntity;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.GetMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

@RestController
public class MyController {

    @GetMapping("/my-endpoint")
    public ResponseEntity<String> myEndpoint() {
        HttpHeaders headers = new HttpHeaders();
        headers.set("Retry-After", "120"); // Set the custom Retry-After header value
        
        // You can also set other headers if needed
        headers.set("Content-Type", "application/json");
        headers.set("X-Custom-Header", "custom value");

        return ResponseEntity.status(HttpStatus.TOO_MANY_REQUESTS)
                             .headers(headers)
                             .body("Too many requests");
    }

}


In this example, the /my-endpoint endpoint returns a Too many requests message with a status code of 429 Too Many Requests and a custom Retry-After header set to 120 seconds.


How to handle X-Powered-By header in Spring Boot?

To handle the X-Powered-By header in Spring Boot, you can follow these steps:

  1. Add the spring-boot-starter-web dependency to your pom.xml file:
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<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web</artifactId>
</dependency>


  1. Create a configuration class that extends WebMvcConfigurerAdapter. For example:
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@Configuration
public class WebConfig extends WebMvcConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    public void configureHttpMessageConverters(List<HttpMessageConverter<?>> converters) {
        super.configureHttpMessageConverters(converters);
        converters.add(new MappingJackson2HttpMessageConverter());
        converters.add(new StringHttpMessageConverter());
    }

    @Override
    public void configureDefaultServletHandling(DefaultServletHandlerConfigurer configurer) {
        configurer.enable();
    }

    @Override
    public void addInterceptors(InterceptorRegistry registry) {
        registry.addInterceptor(new MyInterceptor());
    }
}


  1. Create an interceptor class to modify the response headers. For example:
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public class MyInterceptor extends HandlerInterceptorAdapter {

    @Override
    public void postHandle(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, Object handler,
                           ModelAndView modelAndView) throws Exception {

        response.setHeader("X-Powered-By", "My App");

        super.postHandle(request, response, handler, modelAndView);
    }
}


  1. Now, whenever a request is made to your Spring Boot application, the MyInterceptor class will run after the request is handled and modify the response headers to include X-Powered-By: My App. This will add the X-Powered-By header to each response.


Note: Make sure to replace "My App" with your desired value for the X-Powered-By header.

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Can I modify the request timeout header in Spring Boot?

Yes, you can modify the request timeout header in Spring Boot. Spring Boot allows you to configure the timeout duration for different operations including HTTP requests.


To modify the request timeout header, you can do the following:

  1. In your Spring Boot application, open the application.yml or application.properties file.
  2. Add the following property to modify the request timeout: For application.yml: server: servlet: request-timeout: 5000 # set timeout in milliseconds For application.properties: server.servlet.request-timeout=5000 # set timeout in milliseconds
  3. Save the changes and restart your Spring Boot application.


By setting the server.servlet.request-timeout property, you can modify the request timeout duration as per your requirement. The timeout value is specified in milliseconds.


Can I set a custom Accept-Language header in Spring Boot?

Yes, you can set a custom Accept-Language header in Spring Boot by using the LocaleResolver interface.


You can create a custom implementation of the LocaleResolver interface to set the desired Accept-Language header manually. Here's an example:

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import org.springframework.context.i18n.AcceptHeaderLocaleResolver;
import org.springframework.http.HttpHeaders;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.LocaleResolver;
import org.springframework.web.util.WebUtils;

import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;
import java.util.Locale;

@Component
public class CustomLocaleResolver extends AcceptHeaderLocaleResolver implements LocaleResolver {

    private static final String ACCEPT_LANGUAGE_HEADER = "Accept-Language";

    @Override
    public Locale resolveLocale(HttpServletRequest request) {
        String acceptLanguage = request.getHeader(ACCEPT_LANGUAGE_HEADER);
        if (acceptLanguage != null && !acceptLanguage.isEmpty()) {
          // Set the desired Locale based on the custom Accept-Language header
            // Here's an example of setting it to French:
            if (acceptLanguage.contains("fr")) {
                return Locale.FRENCH;
            } 
            // Add more conditions for other languages if needed
        }
        // Default to the default resolver behavior (accept-language negotiation)
        return super.resolveLocale(request);
    }

    @Override
    public void setLocale(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, Locale locale) {
          // Store the custom locale or perform any other operations as per your requirement
        super.setLocale(request, response, locale);
    }
}


In this example, the resolveLocale() method is overridden to check for the custom Accept-Language header and set the desired Locale accordingly. If the header is not set or doesn't match any conditions, the default resolver behavior is used.


To use this custom implementation, you need to register it as a bean in your Spring Boot application. For example, you can define it in your @Configuration class:

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import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.LocaleResolver;

@Configuration
public class WebConfig {

    @Autowired
    private CustomLocaleResolver customLocaleResolver;

    @Bean
    public LocaleResolver localeResolver() {
        return customLocaleResolver;
    }

}


Now, when a request is made to your Spring Boot application, it will use your custom Accept-Language header to determine the desired Locale.

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